Posts in Lifestyle
Three Reasons Why Marketers Shouldn't Overlook The Silver Generation

In the classic 1985 film Back to the Future, Marty McFly is a typical American teenager who finds himself propelled back to 1955. After setting his teenage parents on the road to romance (and saving his own life in the process), Marty finds himself back, safe and sound, in 1985. He doesn’t stay there, of course. In 1989’s Back to the Future Part II, Marty ends up traveling into his future -- to 2015 -- for more unlikely adventures before returning home.

Note that Marty pulls off a neat trick in these two movies (let’s ignore the less-inspired third continuation). He manages to travel across a span of six decades while consistently keeping his wits about him. He’s alert the entire time. He can tell the good guys from the bad guys. He retains his wit and humor. He’s nobody’s fool. Ultimately, he’s in charge.

Guess what? Marketers who treat their older audiences differently in the real world -- including those who have figuratively “time traveled” through many decades -- are making a mistake. Just because some consumers were rocking to Chuck Berry in 1955 doesn’t mean they won’t still be rocking to whoever tops the charts in 2025. They aren’t fading away, like the family members in the photograph Marty holds on to. In fact, by all indications I have seen, “silver” consumers make the best consumers.

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More Benches, Special Goggles: Taking Steps to Assist Older Travelers

Samantha Flores was having a tough time getting through the airport. The signs were hard to see, the announcements were hard to hear and the people rushing by made her feel unsteady on her stiffened knees. Finally, with relief, she made her way to a bench to sit down, catch her breath and take off her “age simulation suit.”

Ms. Flores is the director for experiential design for the architecture firm Corgan, and the nearly 30-pound suit was meant to help her, a 32-year-old, experience the physical challenges of navigating the world as an older person. Goggles and headphones “impaired” her sight and hearing. Gloves reduced feeling and simulated hand tremors. Weighted shoes, along with neck, elbow and knee movement restrictors, approximated mobility limitations.

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What you can do right now to stop robocalls

Billions of robocalls are vexing Americans — and it's not slowing down.

Many of the unsolicited calls are from scammers pretending to be tax collectors, charities, or salespeople. Short of throwing your phone in the garbage, there's no way to avoid them altogether. But wireless providers and smartphone developers offer tools to filter out at least some unwanted calls.

Not all robocalls are fake or illegal: Pharmacies and utility companies, for example, use the technique to reach customers. You can ban telemarketers by registering with the federal "Do Not Call" list — but that won't stop fake telemarketers or scammers, many of whom have ways to get around spam filters. You can report unsolicited calls to authorities.

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Meet Fashion’s Next Generation: Over 60s

LONDON, United Kingdom — Lyn Slater, a 64-year-old college professor in New York, hates the concept of age. 

“When I was young, we were burning bras, we were getting high all the time and we dated all the time,” she said. “Why do you think we would accept that our life ends when we turn a certain age?” 

But age is a subject that comes up for Slater more than most. That’s because she is closing in on 500,000 followers on Instagram, better known as a platform for teenage influencers. Posting under the handle “Accidental Icon,” Slater wears everything from Balenciaga to JW AndersonValentino, Uniqlo and other companies have hired Slater for advertising campaigns and collaborations on Instagram and her blog.

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These Butt-Kicking Seniors are getting their peers in shape

t’s time to put your notions of old age out to pasture.

Far from retiring, these NYC seniors are having the time of their lives working as fitness instructors — and using their years of training to sculpt, tone and perfect bodies of all ages. Who said that jocks had to be young?

In fact, fitness programs for the elderly are among the top health trends for 2018, according to the American College of Sports Medicine’s Health & Fitness Journal’s 2018 survey of thousands of physical fitness professionals.

“When you’re older, you really need an older teacher,” Marjorie Jaffe, a senior personal trainer who focuses on older clients, tells The Post. “You’re really not interested in [toning] your arms or your butt. You’re more interested in your balance, keeping your body straight and not limiting your life.”

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CLIMBING IN MY SEVENTIES

Earlier this year, when a chance to see Peru’s Machu Picchu presented itself, I asked, Why not? I had never been to South America. I had always wanted to see the Inca ruins in the Sacred Valley.

I tamped down the doubting thoughts that said, don’t be silly, you’re 72, you’ve had two back surgeries and a hip replacement. You’ll never be able to deal with the altitude. What about your balance on those narrow trails?

If I had listened to those voices, I would have stayed home. Instead, along with my partner I researched altitude sickness on the internet (chlorophyll helps!). Then we packed our bags and set off.

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Chula Vista senior citizens rock the fashion runway

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) - Senior citizens in Chula Vista lit up the runway at St. Paul's Plaza, a senior living community.

It was the center's first fashion show and eight residents were transformed into models. 

Each had makeup, hair, and wardrobe provided thanks to Macy's. 

“Today’s fashion show is all about friendships," said Mary Johnson with the community outreach team. "Friendships are just as important as taking good care of yourself, exercising, and good nutrition. As we get older friendships get even more important."

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An introduction to growing flowers and herbs from seed

In 2012, the photographer Sabina Rüber and I started a project to grow annuals from seed. We soon realized that there is an enormous and exciting range of plants that are cheap, quick and often amazingly easy to grow in this way – not only annual flowers but also perennials, ornamental grasses and herbs – and we set ourselves the challenge of growing as many as we could. The first year was a washout. It was the wettest spring for decades and most of our seedlings were destroyed. But I was not ready to give up so, the following year, I created a new cutting patch, which I filled almost entirely with plants I had raised from seed. Rather than buying expensive perennials or trays of bedding plants, I had spent just a few pounds on packets of seed that would produce hundreds of plants. I was hooked.

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6 of the top gardening trends for 2019, according to Wyevale Garden Centre

Wyevale Garden Centre have just released their annual report of gardening trends worth knowing about in 2019 – great for garden-lovers looking for ways to refresh their shrubs, bushes and plants.

Whether you're planning to create a lovely low-key look on your balcony space or want to perfect your potted selection of indoor plants, there are plenty of ways to create a garden to be proud of.

From a shift towards greener, more sustainable gardens, to planting vegetables in the front garden, these are the trends for every green-fingered garden enthusiast to try now.

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Delia Owens on "Where the Crawdads Sing"

It's almost in Canada, with a view of Montana. That's how remote this northern corner of Idaho really is, worlds away from almost everything, except nature. For writer Delia Owens, it's heaven. Wildlife is her church, vast isolation her muse. 

Does she get lonely out here? "I do. I get so lonely sometimes I feel like I can't breathe."

"But you like a part of that though, right?" asked correspondent Lee Cowan. 

"I do, I do. And I decided to write a book about it."

That book, "Where the Crawdads Sing," has become a phenomenon. At a recent book fair in Savannah, Georgia, she had readers lined up around the block just to meet her.

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Silver Success: the Business Lowdown for Senior Entrepreneurs

Seniors are one of the hottest demographics in small business right now; over a quarter of all new businesses were started by someone over 55, and half of all small businesses are owned by someone between the ages of 50 and 88.

It’s not hard to see why seniors succeed: they’re often more financially stable, have solid contacts from their years in the workplace, have more experience and are better able to approach the variations of the business world with a level head. That said, there are certain unique challenges that seniors face when going into business for the first time. These key tips will help your new business get off to a flying start.

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Our Aging Population can be an Economic Powerhouse if we let it

Patrick O’Halloran is 82 years old, “but I’m still a work in progress,” he says. After a long career as a Jesuit priest and a clinical psychologist in San Francisco, O’Halloran retired to the northwest part of San Mateo, California, where he lives alone. He’s sprightly: His exercise routine includes circuit training, cardio, and boxing, and he volunteers at a nearby jail, teaching classes in mindfulness.

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18 quick, easy and healthy meals for seniors

If you're concerned you or the senior in your life isn't getting enough nutrition, there may be a number of reasons. Perhaps grocery shopping or cooking is too difficult, or meals just aren't as fun to eat alone. Regardless, eating healthy meals is of course incredibly important for the elderly.

Tammera Karr, a board certified holistic nutritionist in Roseburg, Oregon, and Kristi Von Ruden, a registered and licensed dietitian who plans meals for nursing home residents and geriatric outpatients at Northfield Hospital & Clinics in Northfield, Minnesota, came up with 18 easy, tasty and healthy meal ideas for seniors. (See below.)

Before you get cooking, make sure you keep your senior's doctor in the loop, and be sure to check with the medical team about food restrictions  and recommendations before planning menus

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Cooking for Seniors: How to Make Great Tasting Food for the Senior Palate

One of the ongoing challenges for caregivers is contending with the changing reality of seniors’ nutritional needs. Older adults need a different balance of nutrients to ensure physical and mental health, and there are also medications to consider that can interfere or interact with the drugs seniors take. On top of all that, the elderly may have trouble processing some foods, as senses of smell and taste get weaker with age. All of this can add up to major frustration for caregivers and family members trying to provide older loved ones with enough nourishment. Fortunately, healthy senior meals don’t have to be devoid of flavor or excitement.

Check out our tips for some nutritious alternatives that will kick the flavor up a notch and have your whole family cleaning their plates.

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AFRL Senior Scientist Emeritus elected to National Academy

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions afforded to an engineer. For one Air Force engineer, it’s the culmination of a long and storied career.

Dr. Sheldon (Lee) Semiatin, from the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate was recently elected to this prestigious honor and is only one of a handful of AFRL alumni ever elected.

Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice, or education, including significant contributions to engineering literature and pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing innovative approaches to engineering education.

Dr. Semiatin is recognized for his contributions to thermomechanical processing of aerospace alloys and emerging intermetallic materials.

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